Tourists will be banned from climbing Australia's UIuru

One of the landowners, Sammy Wilson, said, 'It is an extremely important place, not a playground or theme park like Disneyland'.

The closure is possible under the terms of the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park Management Plan 2010-2020, which said it can be closed if the proportion of climbers falls below 20 per cent.

Uluru is sacred to indigenous Australians and is thought to have started forming around 550 million years ago.

Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park is jointly managed by Anangu and the Director of National Parks, and was handed back to Anangu in 1985 by the then-Hawke Labor government.

Anangu owners make up a majority of the park's board and would have been able to institute a policy change without the backing of the non-Anangu board members.

Nats hire Martinez as manager
He has always been a rumored candidate for a step up to a managerial spot, and Washington will provide that opportunity. Martinez becomes the seventh full-time manager for the Nats since they moved from Montreal before the 2005 season.

Figures show only 16 per cent of visitors made the climb during its open times between 2011 and 2015.

"This decision is for both Anangu and non-Anangu together to feel proud about; to realise, of course it's the right thing to close it".

Australian tourists are most likely to climb the rock followed by the Japanese, according to the park's figures.

"The path left by rubber from the soles of climbers' shoes is visible from kilometres away and some tourists leave litter and damage the rock". (She said it was "a tribute to the greatness of the Rock", not an act of disrespect.) There have also been reports of people defecating on the sacred site.

At least 37 people have died attempting to climb the rock since records of fatalities began in the 1950s.

  • Megan Austin