Tropical Storm Franklin could be hurricane when hits Yucatan

"Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 140 miles [220 km] from the center".

Tropical Storm Franklin forms in the northwest Caribbean Sea. After that it could make a second landfall in mainland Mexico.

Franklin is now moving west / northwest at the rate of 20 km/h with maximum winds near the center of 55 km/h and gusts of 93 km/h for its current trajectory and gradual approach to the coast of the state of Quintana Roo.

A Hurricane Watch has been issued for a portion of the Yucatan Coast as Tropical Storm Franklin becomes more organized. Tropical storm warnings are in effect for parts of central America.

Franklin was still a minimal tropical storm with winds of 45 miles per hour.

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Right now Tropical Storm Franklin continues to build and strengthen east of Mexico.

The first named storm to threaten Mexico since the closure of the latest MultiCat Mexico cat bond is now heading towards the Yucatan peninsula. It could be a hurricane by the time it hits landfall Monday evening, according to the National Hurricane Center.

This image depicts the forecast cone path probability for the potential tropical storm.

The U.S.is not expected to see damage from this system other than parts of the Texas Gulf Coast seeing high surf and risky rip currents later in the week, The Weather Channel reported. Further development is considered unlikely, with forecast odds of it developing into a tropical system at 10 percent in the next 48 hours, and 30 percent in the next five days. Using the entirety of hurricane records dating back to 1851, the average date of the sixth named storm formation is September 20 - so Franklin formed a whopping six weeks ahead of an average season.

  • Megan Austin