Facebook Is Going After Revenge Porn

Facebook is cracking down on so-called "revenge porn" by bringing in tools to make images easier to report and to prevent them being shared. "This is part of our ongoing effort to help build a safe community on and off Facebook", the company said.

The study also brought up the issue of safety: 59 percent of victims had had their full name shared along with intimate images, and many others had their social media profiles, email addresses, phone numbers, and home addresses shared, as well.

The Guardian reports that the tech giant unveiled a series of new tools that will allow users to quickly alert the company if they see intimate photos posted without an individual's consent.

Facebook then use photo-matching technologies to help thwart further attempts to share the image on Facebook, Messenger, and Instagram.

Users who share "revenge porn" may see their accounts disabled, the company said. Facebook is hoping to cut down on the occurrences of revenge porn that appear on its platforms.

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Facebook's public policy director for global safety Antigone Davis said consulting with both the safety organisations and people affected by such incidents had made it clear the social platform had a role to play in helping to prevent the non-consensual sharing of such images. They offer an appeals process if someone believes an image was taken down in error.

Meena Kumari at independent charity Victim Support said Facebook's announcement was a positive move but more needed to be done to support victims of revenge porn.

"Revenge porn" is the term used for when a person shares sexually explicit images of somebody without their consent.

The move comes after a controversial incident involving a secret Facebook group of USA and British marines, where nude images of service women were being shared. Facebook considers it any intimate photo that's shared without permission (potato, potahto). If someone re-shares a previously reported and removed image, it will be taken down and the user will be notified. We also launched a guide specific to Facebook. The decision is also based on inputs from the National Network to End Domestic Violence, Center for Social Research, the Revenge Porn Helpline (United Kingdom) and the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative.

  • Regina Walsh